Facebook, Privacy, and You: The Ultimate Guide

Facebook, Privacy, and You: The Ultimate Guide

Facebook is a behemoth of information. It’s the company’s business model (predicated on advertising and third-party integrations), and it’s not stopping anytime soon.

If you object to your data being used in this manner, you can always delete Facebook, but for many people that’s not a realistic path — Facebook and its Single Sign-On controls are so integrated into people’s lives at this point that it’s nigh-impossible for some to extricate from the platform.

Instead, consider using Facebook’s built-in privacy controls and settings to control your sharing — and give away only the information that you want to have out on the web.

  • How to spot fake social media posts & photos before sharing
  • How to download a copy of your Facebook data
  • How to lie to Facebook
  • How to adjust your privacy settings on Facebook
  • How to stop Facebook from tracking your location
  • How to stop Facebook from accessing your microphone
  • How to keep Instagram from scraping your data
  • How to restrict data collection for third-party apps
  • How to prevent friends’ apps from getting your data
  • How to opt out of Facebook’s data brokers
  • How to remove your Facebook data without deleting your account
  • How to lock down social media for your kids

How to spot fake social media posts & photos before sharing

Being smart with your data on Facebook isn’t just about your own information — it’s about what you share, too. Given our attraction to the outrageous and unbelievable, it’s no surprise the most popular social media posts are often the most wrong. Before you hit the share button on a viral photo, consider a quick fact check using these methods.

How to download a copy of your Facebook data

Taking control of your Facebook data starts with understanding just how much of your data is stored with Facebook. The social media service offers a self-help tool that gives you access to your entire trove of personal data. It’s actually a fairly simple process that lets you see all your photos, videos, friends, contact info, messages, apps, and quite a bit more that Facebook’s storing on its servers.

How to lie to Facebook

A few years back, I reworked my Facebook account to lock down my personal information; given everything that happens with the social media giant week by week, I figured I’d walk everyone through the steps I took to keep Facebook from accidentally broadcasting valuable data to the world.

How to adjust your privacy settings on Facebook

Facebook allows you to customize who can see your posts, pages, friend list, and more. It also allows you to restrict who can send you friend requests or look you up by your provided contact information. Here’s how to customize it.

How to stop Facebook from tracking your location

One of Facebook’s many features is that you can “check in” from your current location, letting your friends and family know where you are or where you’ve been. You can also use Facebook to let your friends know where you are right now using the Nearby Friends feature.

If you don’t feel comfortable sharing your every move with a bunch of advertisers, you can protect your privacy and disable location tracking.

How to stop Facebook from accessing your microphone

If you’ve ever received an advertisement in your Facebook feed that’s eerily related to a topic you discussed in real life, it might feel a bit like Facebook is listening in on your conversations through its Messenger app (which asks to access your microphone when you start using it).

Facebook has gone on record to state that it does not listen in on your conversations. But if you’re still concerned about this, you can disable microphone access from your Settings app.

How to keep Instagram from scraping your data

Facebook has been the subject of a lot of criticism recently, and what have we learned? Trust no one. That includes other companies that have a lot of access to your personal data, like your family photos and where you were when you took those photos. The convenience of location-based metadata for photos is great for you and me, but can also be used by those same companies that betrayed our trust, especially when those same companies own some of the other social media services we love, like Instagram.

How to restrict data collection for third-party apps

Facebook’s Single Sign On service makes logging in and creating accounts for apps, games, and services easy. But when you use Facebook to log in, Facebook gives those apps access to your data — a lot of your data.

There are a number of ways to reduce the amount of data you share with Facebook — including providing fake information in your profile, changing profile settings so that certain information displays only to you, and stopping apps from collecting your data entirely.

But one of the best ways to ensure that you aren’t sharing anything is to check your third-party app list and see exactly what you’re providing to these services. If necessary, you can even disable Facebook’s app platform altogether…..Read more>>

 

 

 

Source:- imore

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